Skip to main content

The Story of Your Bones: Calcium at Every Age

Tags: Interactive Tools

HOW MUCH CALCIUM DOES YOUR BODY NEED THROUGHOUT YOUR LIFE?

There's no such thing as ‘too old’ or ‘too young’ for regular calcium. Since bones are a living part of your body, they need to be nourished every day to help support your body through all the stages of your life.

No matter how many years ‘young’ you are today, calcium from Caltrate and a healthy, balanced diet can help support your bone health.

Browse the categories below to see your calcium needs at each stage of life.

 

CHOOSE A LIFE STAGE

INFANT/TODDLER+

GROWTH SPURTS!

Growing (and learning) is a full-time job for infants and toddlers. They need the proper nutrients to help their bodies do just that.

Fact: These are the prime years to set the stage for bone growth & development.
Action Plan: Create a stimulating, active environment — holding, touching, face-to-face contact & hugs!

+ Caltrate is not formulated for use in children.

BHC_StoryOfYourBones_Infant

YOUTH+

BHC_StoryOfYourBones Youth

TIME TO INVEST.

Did you know?

Just like saving for your first car from a young age, proper calcium is essential to prepare for healthy bones in later years.
• Fact: Maximising bone mass early in life helps reduce bone loss and may reduce the risk of osteoporosis in later years.
• Action Plan:  Get them playing sports and keep them moving! Children & young adults need daily physical activity to stay healthy.
• Calcium Requirement: Children & young adults aged 9 – 18 years need 1300 mg of calcium-rich food daily.1

+ Caltrate is not formulated for use in children.

PREGNANCY & BREASTFEEDING

EXTRA NUTRIENTS FOR YOU & BABY.

During pregnancy and breastfeeding, your body absorbs more calcium from food so your baby can build healthy teeth and bones.

• Fact: If you don’t get enough calcium in your diet during pregnancy, your baby will take calcium from your bones.
• Action Plan: Pay close attention to your nutritional habits during this time. Ask your doctor before taking Calcium and Vitamin D supplements if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
• Calcium Requirement: Meet or exceed recommended dosage for Adults. Calcium needs will vary for individuals. Consult your healthcare professional for guidance.

BHC_StoryOfYourBones_Childbearing

ADULT

BHC_StoryOfYourBones_Adult

BONE HEALTH: A TOP PRIORITY!

We hit peak bone mass at around the age of 30. That means, when you're not getting enough calcium in your diet, bone mass can begin to decrease.

• Fact: Less than half of all Australian adults get their daily recommended intake of calcium.2
• Action Plan: Get at least 30 minutes per day of physical activity. Weight-bearing activities like running can also help build bone strength. Focus on proper calcium intake, which may include supplementation with a product like Caltrate.
• Calcium Requirement: Healthy adults need 1,000 to 1,300 mg of calcium per day, depending on age. Consult your healthcare professional to find out an appropriate supplementation level for you.

POSTMENOPAUSAL

HORMONE CHANGES = NUTRITIONAL CHANGES

Women have a higher risk of developing osteoporosis. Women experience a rapid decline in oestrogen levels during menopause. When oestrogen levels decrease, bones lose calcium and other minerals at a faster rate.3 This change can have a significant impact on bone mass.

• Fact: Bone loss is common during this age, making adequate calcium intake crucial.
• Action Plan: Consider if calcium supplementation is right for you. Focus on physical activity to maintain bone density and strength. Monitor your vitamin D levels to help optimise calcium absorption.
• Calcium Requirement: Healthy adults need 1,000 to 1,300 mg of calcium per day, depending on age4 . Consult your doctor to find out an appropriate intake level for you.

BHC_StoryOfYourBones_PostM

CALCIUM PLAYS AN IMPORTANT ROLE THROUGH EACH STAGE OF LIFE.

A healthy diet that includes enough calcium and vitamin D, to help optimise its absorption, along with weight-bearing physical activity every day, may help reduce the risk of osteoporosis later in life.

References:
1.Nutrient Reference Values (2014), Calcium.Available at: https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/calcium[Accessed 20 January 2016]
2.Osteoporosis Australia (2015), Calcium. Available at: http://www.osteoporosis.org.au/calcium[Accessed 20 January 2016]
3.Osteoporosis Australia (2016). Risk factors. Available at: http://www.osteoporosis.org.au/risk-factors[Accessed 16 March 2016]
4.Nutrient Reference Values (2014), Calcium.Available at: https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/calcium[Accessed 20 January 2016]